The Statue of Liberty Paragraph

The Statue of Liberty Paragraph

The Statue of Liberty originally is called Liberty Enlightening the world. It is a statue situated on Liberty Island, formerly Bedloe’s Island, in the harbor of New York. The statue PT: symbolizes liberty in the form of a woman wearing flowing robes and a spiked crown. She holds a torch aloft in her right hand and carries in her left hand a book inscribed on July 4, 1776. A broken chain symbolizes the overthrow of tyranny. It lies at her feet. The statue was designed by the French sculptor Frederic Bartholdi and was given by France to the United n) 31: States to commemorate the centennial of US Independence in 1876. France raised funds by popular subscription to pay for the statue: US donors financed the pedestal and installation of the monument. President Grover Cleveland dedicated the work on October 28, 1886. The statue, the Island, and nearby Ellis Island were declared a national role, a monument in 1924. The statue Is, formed of copper sheets riveted to an iron framework. It is one of the largest statues in the world. It measures 93.5 m (306 ft 8in) from the bottom of all the pedestal to the tip of the torch. The figure itself is 46.4 m (152 ft 2 in) high: the right arm is 12.8 m (42 ft) long: the hand is 5.03 m (16 It 5 in) long, and the head, which is reachable by staircase or emergency lift, measures 8.5m (28ft) from neck to diadem and 3.05 m (10 ft) from ear to ear. The statue weighs 254 tonnes(250 tons). Originally it was conceived as a gesture of international friendship. The statue has become a global symbol of freedom, marking the arrival of millions of immigrants to the United States.

—- Advanced Publications, For class 9-10

The Statue of Liberty Paragraph

You may also read

  1. A Teacher Paragraph
  2.  Deforestation Paragraph
  3. Global Warming Paragraph
  4. Dowry System Paragraph
  5. Internet Paragraph
  6. Physical Exercise Paragraph
  7. A Village Doctor Paragraph
  8. A Book Fair Paragraph
  9. A Rainy Day Paragraph
  10.  Facebook Paragraph

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Comment